Key extracellular enzymes triggered high-efficiency composting associated with bacterial community succession

Cece Qiao, Christopher Penton, Chao Liu, Zongzhuan Shen, Yannan Ou, Zhengyang Liu, Xu Xu, Rong Li, Qirong Shen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A consortium of key bacterial taxa plays critical roles in the composting process. In order to elucidate the identity and mechanisms by which specific bacterial species drive high-efficiency composting, the succession of key bacterial consortia and extracellular enzymes produced during the composting process were monitored in composting piles with varying initial C/N ratios. Results showed that C/N ratios of 25 and 35 enhanced composting efficiency through elevated temperatures, higher germination indices, enhanced cellulose and hemicellulose degradation, and higher cellulase and dehydrogenase activities. The activities of cellulase and β-glucosidase, cellulase and protease, and cellulase and β-glucosidase exhibited significant relationships with bacterial community composition within the mesophilic, thermophilic, and mature phases, respectively. Putative key taxa, linked to a higher composting efficiency, such as Nonomuraea, Desemzia, Cellulosimicrobium, Virgibacillus, Clostridium, and Achromobacter, exhibited significantly positive relationships with extracellular enzyme activities, suggesting a significant contribution to these taxa to the development of composting maturity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number121576
JournalBioresource Technology
Volume288
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

Fingerprint

Composting
composting
Enzymes
enzyme
Cellulase
Glucosidases
Clostridium
Enzyme activity
Cellulose
Piles
enzyme activity
community composition
cellulose
germination
Oxidoreductases
pile
Peptide Hydrolases
Degradation
degradation
Chemical analysis

Keywords

  • Bacterial community
  • C/N ratio
  • Composting efficiency
  • Enzyme activity
  • Key bacterial consortia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Waste Management and Disposal

Cite this

Key extracellular enzymes triggered high-efficiency composting associated with bacterial community succession. / Qiao, Cece; Penton, Christopher; Liu, Chao; Shen, Zongzhuan; Ou, Yannan; Liu, Zhengyang; Xu, Xu; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong.

In: Bioresource Technology, Vol. 288, 121576, 01.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Qiao, Cece ; Penton, Christopher ; Liu, Chao ; Shen, Zongzhuan ; Ou, Yannan ; Liu, Zhengyang ; Xu, Xu ; Li, Rong ; Shen, Qirong. / Key extracellular enzymes triggered high-efficiency composting associated with bacterial community succession. In: Bioresource Technology. 2019 ; Vol. 288.
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