Justification for reassessing elemental analysis data of ceramics, sediments and lithics using rare earth element concentrations and ratios

R. G.V. Hancock, Konstantina-Eleni Michelaki, W. C. Mahaney, S. Aufreiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The mensuration of multi-elemental concentrations from assorted archaeological materials has always required great care and attention to detail to ensure good-quality data and their ensuing interpretations. Although most suspect data were generated before the wide use of computers, error-free data are not still a certainty. This paper presents the geochemical rationale for a proposed chemical data-assessment process, using a globally dispersed collection of ceramic, sediment and lithic data. It is argued that this process can allow archaeologists and archaeometrists to investigate systematically older and current data sets and, if need be, alter them to the reliable values they were originally intended to include.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalArchaeometry
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

data analysis
data quality
Sediment
Elemental Analysis
Justification
Rare Earth Elements
Lithics
interpretation
Values
Archaeology
Certainty
Archaeologists

Keywords

  • ceramics
  • elemental analysis data
  • lithics
  • rare earth elements
  • reassessing elemental data
  • sediments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Archaeology

Cite this

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AU - Aufreiter, S.

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