Jobs, houses, and trees

Changing regional structure, local land-use patterns, and forest cover in Southern Indiana

Darla K. Munroe, Abigail York

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Land-use and -cover change is a topic of increasing concern as interest in forest and agricultural land preservation grows. Urban and residential land use is quickly replacing extractive land use in southern Indiana. The interaction between land quality and urban growth pressures is also causing secondary forest growth and forest clearing to occur jointly in a complex spatial pattern. It is argued that similar processes fuel the abandonment of agricultural land leading to private forest regrowth, changes in topography and land quality, and declining real farm product prices. However, the impact of urban growth and development on forests depends more strongly on changes in both the residential housing and labor markets. Using location quotient analysis of aggregate employment patterns, and the relationship between regional labor market changes, the extent of private forest cover was examined from 1967 to 1998. Then an econometric model of land-use shares in forty southern Indiana counties was developed based on the net benefits to agriculture, forestland, and urban uses. To test the need to control explicitly for changes in residential demand and regional economic structure, a series of nested models was estimated. Some evidence was found that changing agricultural profitability is leading to private forest regrowth. It was also uncovered that the ratio of urban to forest land uses is better explained by incorporating measures of residential land value and industrial concentration than simply considering population density alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-320
Number of pages22
JournalGrowth and Change
Volume34
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

regional structure
forest cover
land use
urban growth
regrowth
labor market
agricultural land
economic structure
housing market
secondary forest
econometrics
profitability
growth and development
urban development
regional labor market
population density
land value
topography
farm
agriculture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development

Cite this

Jobs, houses, and trees : Changing regional structure, local land-use patterns, and forest cover in Southern Indiana. / Munroe, Darla K.; York, Abigail.

In: Growth and Change, Vol. 34, No. 3, 06.2003, p. 299-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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