Abstract

Online education comes in various flavors - skills centered short-duration training, massively open online courses (MOOCs), and more recently, the offering of full online degree programs. In the past 4 years at Arizona State University, the faculty created an online software engineering degree program equivalent to an existing on-campus program, and produced its first graduates in Spring 2017. The challenges in creating this program were significant, but surprisingly the main challenges were not the ones that the faculty anticipated at the outset of the program's development. This paper shares the lessons learned from the development of the online degree program, with an emphasis on the gap between faculty expectations and fears versus the actual issues that needed to be addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - 30th IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, CSEE and T 2017
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages236-240
Number of pages5
Volume2017-January
ISBN (Electronic)9781538625361
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 4 2017
Event30th IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, CSEE and T 2017 - Savannah, United States
Duration: Nov 7 2017Nov 9 2017

Other

Other30th IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, CSEE and T 2017
CountryUnited States
CitySavannah
Period11/7/1711/9/17

Fingerprint

Flavors
Software engineering
Education
engineering
software
graduate
anxiety
education

Keywords

  • Online education
  • Project-based learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Education

Cite this

Gary, K., Sohoni, S., & Lindquist, T. (2017). It's Not What You Think: Lessons Learned Developing an Online Software Engineering Program. In Proceedings - 30th IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, CSEE and T 2017 (Vol. 2017-January, pp. 236-240). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/CSEET.2017.45

It's Not What You Think : Lessons Learned Developing an Online Software Engineering Program. / Gary, Kevin; Sohoni, Sohum; Lindquist, Timothy.

Proceedings - 30th IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, CSEE and T 2017. Vol. 2017-January Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. p. 236-240.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gary, K, Sohoni, S & Lindquist, T 2017, It's Not What You Think: Lessons Learned Developing an Online Software Engineering Program. in Proceedings - 30th IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, CSEE and T 2017. vol. 2017-January, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 236-240, 30th IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, CSEE and T 2017, Savannah, United States, 11/7/17. https://doi.org/10.1109/CSEET.2017.45
Gary K, Sohoni S, Lindquist T. It's Not What You Think: Lessons Learned Developing an Online Software Engineering Program. In Proceedings - 30th IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, CSEE and T 2017. Vol. 2017-January. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2017. p. 236-240 https://doi.org/10.1109/CSEET.2017.45
Gary, Kevin ; Sohoni, Sohum ; Lindquist, Timothy. / It's Not What You Think : Lessons Learned Developing an Online Software Engineering Program. Proceedings - 30th IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, CSEE and T 2017. Vol. 2017-January Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. pp. 236-240
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