It was never meant for us: Towards a black feminist construct of citizenship in social studies

Amanda E. Vickery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This qualitative study focused on how two women African American teachers understand the purpose of teaching social studies and citizenship. The multiple identities as African American women and teachers along with their knowledge of African American history impacted the way notions of citizenship were understood and taught to students. The teachers drew on tenets of Black Feminist thought to make sense of construct of citizenship. Instead of conveying traditional notions of citizenship that include personal responsibility, patriotism, and membership to the nation state, they rejected these constructs of citizenship and understood their role as social studies teachers to instill notions of community membership and agency as aspects of citizenship. African American teacher's alternative notions of citizenship may provide a framework by which reconceptualized multiple views of American citizenship may be presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-172
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Social Studies Research
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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