Isotope tracer measures of meal fatty acid metabolism: Reproducibility and effects of the menstrual cycle

Ana Paola Uranga, James Levine, Michael Jensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oxidation and adipose tissue uptake of dietary fat can be measured by adding fatty acid tracers to meals. These studies were conducted to measure between-study variability of these types of experiments and assess whether dietary fatty acids are handled differently in the follicular vs. luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Healthy normal-weight men (n = 12) and women (n = 12) participated in these studies, which were block randomized to control for study order, isotope ([3H]triolein vs. [14C]triolein), and menstrual cycle. Energy expenditure (indirect calorimetry), meal fatty acid oxidation, and meal fatty acid uptake into upper body and lower body subcutaneous fat (biopsies) 24 h after the experimental meal were measured. A greater portion of meal fatty acids was stored in upper body subcutaneous adipose tissue (24 ± 2 vs. 16 ± 2%, P < 0.005) and lower body fat (12 ± 1 vs. 7 ± 1%, P < 0.005) in women than in men. Meal fatty acid oxidation (3H2O generation) was greater in men than in women (52 ± 3 vs. 45 ± 2%, P = 0.04). Leg adipose tissue uptake of meal fatty acids was 15 ± 2% in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle and 10 ± 1% in the luteal phase (P = NS). Variance in meal fatty acid uptake was somewhat (P = NS) greater in women than in men, although menstrual cycle factors did not contribute significantly. We conclude that leg uptake of dietary fat is slightly more variable in women than in men, but that there are no major effects of menstrual cycle on meal fatty acid disposal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume288
Issue number3 51-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Menstrual Cycle
Metabolism
Isotopes
Meals
Fatty Acids
Triolein
Adipose Tissue
Luteal Phase
Subcutaneous Fat
Dietary Fats
Tissue
Oxidation
Leg
Fats
Indirect Calorimetry
Follicular Phase
Biopsy
Calorimetry
Energy Metabolism
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Adipose tissue biopsy
  • Indirect calorimetry
  • Isotope dilution
  • Triglyceride

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Isotope tracer measures of meal fatty acid metabolism : Reproducibility and effects of the menstrual cycle. / Uranga, Ana Paola; Levine, James; Jensen, Michael.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 288, No. 3 51-3, 03.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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