Isolation of bacteroides from fish and human fecal samples for identification of unique molecular markers

Leila Kabiri, Absar Alum, Channah Rock, Jean E. McLain, Morteza Abbaszadegan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bacteroides molecular markers have been used to identify human fecal contamination in natural waters, but recent work in our laboratory confirmed cross-amplification of several human-specific Bacteroides spp. assays with fecal DNA from fish. For identification of unique molecular markers, Bacteroides from human (n = 4) and fish (n = 7) fecal samples were cultured and their identities were further confirmed using Rapid ID32A API strips. The 16S rDNA from multiple isolates from each sample was PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced to identify unique markers for development of more stringent human-specific assays. In human feces, Bacteroides vulgatus was the dominant species (75% of isolates), whereas in tilapia feces, Bacteroides eggerthii was dominant (66%). Bacteroides from grass carp, channel catfish, and blue catfish may include Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides ovatus, or Bacteroides stercoris. Phylogenic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed distinct Bacteroides groupings from each fish species, while human sequences clustered with known B. vulgatus. None of the fish isolates showed significant similarity to Bacteroides sequences currently deposited in NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information). This study expands the current sequence database of cultured fish Bacteroides. Such data are essential for identification of unique molecular markers in human Bacteroides that can be utilized in differentiating fish and human fecal contamination in water samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)771-777
Number of pages7
JournalCanadian Journal of Microbiology
Volume59
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Bacteroides
Fishes
Feces
Ictaluridae
Tilapia
Information Centers
Catfishes
Carps
Water
Biotechnology
Ribosomal DNA
rRNA Genes

Keywords

  • Bacteroides
  • Biomarker
  • Fecal contamination
  • Fish
  • Source tracking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Isolation of bacteroides from fish and human fecal samples for identification of unique molecular markers. / Kabiri, Leila; Alum, Absar; Rock, Channah; McLain, Jean E.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza.

In: Canadian Journal of Microbiology, Vol. 59, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 771-777.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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