Is major depressive disorder of dysthymia more strongly associated with bulimia nervosa?

Marisol Perez La Mar, Thomas E. Joiner, Peter M. Lewinsohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Research on adult samples has found that the comorbidity between depression and eating disorders exceeds the comorbidity of any other Axis I disorder and eating disorders. Few studies have investigated the specific associations of major depression versus dysthymia with eating disorders. Method: This sample consisted of 937 adolescents who were repeatedly assessed until the age of 24. Results: Analyses revealed that dysthymia was a stronger correlate with bulimia than major depression, even while controlling for other mood disorders and a history of depression and dysthymia. Conclusions: The presence of dysthymia in adolescence might be a possible risk factor for the development of bulimia nervosa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-61
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bulimia Nervosa
eating disorders
Major Depressive Disorder
Depression
adolescence
Comorbidity
binging
emotions
Bulimia
risk factors
Mood Disorders
sampling
bulimia nervosa
Research
Feeding and Eating Disorders
comorbidity
methodology

Keywords

  • Bulimia
  • Depression
  • Dysthymia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Food Science
  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Is major depressive disorder of dysthymia more strongly associated with bulimia nervosa? / Perez La Mar, Marisol; Joiner, Thomas E.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.

In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, Vol. 36, No. 1, 07.2004, p. 55-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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