Is It Proper for Psychologists to Discuss Medications With Clients?

Jill Littrell, Jose Ashford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Situations are analyzed in which psychologists might be asked for information about the efficacy or side effects of pharmacotherapy. The ethics and legality of providing information about physician-prescribed treatments by members of the health care delivery system who are not physicians are considered. Those articles in the psychologist's ethical code bearing on the issue are also discussed. Relevant court cases and statutes in the professions of nursing and pharmacy are examined. For these professions, the findings in relevant cases, coupled with the manner in which recent legislation has been written, suggest that nonphysician members of the health care delivery system can discuss treatments, including medications, prescribed by physicians. The question of a duty of psychologists to discuss medications in the context of obtaining informed consent is raised.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)238-244
Number of pages7
JournalProfessional Psychology: Research and Practice
Volume26
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1995

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Psychology
Delivery of Health Care
Physicians
Codes of Ethics
Informed Consent
Legislation
Ethics
Nursing
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Is It Proper for Psychologists to Discuss Medications With Clients? / Littrell, Jill; Ashford, Jose.

In: Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, Vol. 26, No. 3, 06.1995, p. 238-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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