Is it godly to waste food? How understanding consumers' religion can help reduce consumer food waste

Elizabeth A. Minton, Kathryn A. Johnson, Maricarmen Vizcaino, Christopher Wharton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Food waste is a problem worldwide, but solutions have yet to adequately incorporate consumers' core values—values which are often rooted in religion. Study 1 shows that restrictive religious norms (e.g., rules about food consumption, fasting) lead to greater food waste, whereas supportive religious norms (e.g., sharing food) lead to reduced food waste. Study 2 replicates prior findings and rules out competing explanations. Study 3 manipulates marketing messaging to show that consumers with higher (lower) levels of religiosity are more likely to reduce food waste with a prevention (promotion) framed message partnered with environmental reasoning or a promotion (prevention) framed message partnered with people-based reasoning. Implications for marketers, consumer advocacy groups, and policy makers desiring to reduce food waste are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Consumer Affairs
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • food waste
  • religion
  • sustainability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

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