Iron status in free-living, low income very elderly

M. M. Manore, L. A. Vaughan, S. S. Carroll

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In order to determine the effect of age, sex, dietary and supplemental iron intakes and chronic disease factors and iron status and serum ferritin concentrations, 69 free-living very elderly (≥ 75 yrs) were recruited. Subjects completed demographic and health history questionnaires, 3-day diet records and provided a fasting blood sample for determination of iron status parameters. Subjects were predominately white (mean age 80 yrs) and low income (52% < $10,000; 23% $10,000-$15,000, annually). Women had significantly lower hemoglobin, serum iron and percent transferrin saturation as compared with the men. Only one subject had a total iron intake <2/3 the RDA, but 22% supplemented with iron. Iron deficiency anemia was prevalent in only 3% of the population; iron status in general, however, was lower than that reported in other free-living elderly. Neither serum ferritin, total iron intake, age, nor income were good predictors of iron status in this population. Serum ferritin was >200 ng/mL in 38 of the subjects, but half of these high values could be explained by pre-existing disease factors.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1-12
    Number of pages12
    JournalNutrition Reports International
    Volume39
    Issue number1
    StatePublished - 1989

    Fingerprint

    income
    Iron
    iron
    Dietary Iron
    Diet Records
    Preexisting Condition Coverage
    Ferritins
    Nutrition
    Fasting
    Blood
    Chronic Disease
    Demography
    Health
    ferritin
    blood serum
    chronic diseases
    fasting
    demographic statistics
    questionnaires
    Serum

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Food Science
    • Biochemistry
    • Endocrinology
    • Medicine (miscellaneous)

    Cite this

    Manore, M. M., Vaughan, L. A., & Carroll, S. S. (1989). Iron status in free-living, low income very elderly. Nutrition Reports International, 39(1), 1-12.

    Iron status in free-living, low income very elderly. / Manore, M. M.; Vaughan, L. A.; Carroll, S. S.

    In: Nutrition Reports International, Vol. 39, No. 1, 1989, p. 1-12.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Manore, MM, Vaughan, LA & Carroll, SS 1989, 'Iron status in free-living, low income very elderly', Nutrition Reports International, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 1-12.
    Manore MM, Vaughan LA, Carroll SS. Iron status in free-living, low income very elderly. Nutrition Reports International. 1989;39(1):1-12.
    Manore, M. M. ; Vaughan, L. A. ; Carroll, S. S. / Iron status in free-living, low income very elderly. In: Nutrition Reports International. 1989 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 1-12.
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    abstract = "In order to determine the effect of age, sex, dietary and supplemental iron intakes and chronic disease factors and iron status and serum ferritin concentrations, 69 free-living very elderly (≥ 75 yrs) were recruited. Subjects completed demographic and health history questionnaires, 3-day diet records and provided a fasting blood sample for determination of iron status parameters. Subjects were predominately white (mean age 80 yrs) and low income (52{\%} < $10,000; 23{\%} $10,000-$15,000, annually). Women had significantly lower hemoglobin, serum iron and percent transferrin saturation as compared with the men. Only one subject had a total iron intake <2/3 the RDA, but 22{\%} supplemented with iron. Iron deficiency anemia was prevalent in only 3{\%} of the population; iron status in general, however, was lower than that reported in other free-living elderly. Neither serum ferritin, total iron intake, age, nor income were good predictors of iron status in this population. Serum ferritin was >200 ng/mL in 38 of the subjects, but half of these high values could be explained by pre-existing disease factors.",
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