Iron-rich clay minerals on Mars: potential sources or sinks for hydrogen and indicators of hydrogen loss over time

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

ALthough direct evidence is lacking, indirect evidence suggests that iron-rich clay minerals or poorly-ordered chemical equivalents ("palagonite') are widespread on the Martian surface. Such clays (or other Fe and OH-bearing phases) can act as sources or sinks for hydrogen ("hydrogen sponges'). In theory, metastable ferric oxy-clays formed by dehydrogenation of ferrous clays over geologic time could, if exposed to water vapor, extract the hydrogen from it, releasing oxygen. Did this happen during the Viking gas exchange experiments on Mars? -from Author

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProc. 19th lunar and planetary science conference
EditorsG. Ryder, V.L. Sharpton
PublisherCambridge University Press/Lunar & Planetary Institute
Pages423-432
Number of pages10
StatePublished - 1989

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

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    Burt, D. (1989). Iron-rich clay minerals on Mars: potential sources or sinks for hydrogen and indicators of hydrogen loss over time. In G. Ryder, & V. L. Sharpton (Eds.), Proc. 19th lunar and planetary science conference (pp. 423-432). Cambridge University Press/Lunar & Planetary Institute.