Introduction

Searching for the historical roots of 11 March 2011

Lisa Onaga, Aaron Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Debates about preserving traces of disaster for historical commemoration have emerged amid the processes of recovery and healing from the 2011 Great Tōhoku Earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear power plant disasters. Prompted by the tensions that underlie decisions about the value of maintaining damaged artifacts and structures for public memorialization, this essay introduces the forum “Japan Before Disaster Studies,” which encourages a reconsideration of “disaster heritage” as something that also maintains an active awareness of the roles of technology and science in the depths of Japan’s disaster histories. Reconstructing these roots of disaster histories should enrich a more accessible understanding of the actors, institutions, policies, and discourses connected to various disaster contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)154-158
Number of pages5
JournalTechnology and Culture
Volume58
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Disasters
Tsunamis
Disaster
Nuclear power plants
Earthquakes
Recovery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Introduction : Searching for the historical roots of 11 March 2011. / Onaga, Lisa; Moore, Aaron.

In: Technology and Culture, Vol. 58, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 154-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f7b9be1458224e0d87deb377e40ec04a,
title = "Introduction: Searching for the historical roots of 11 March 2011",
abstract = "Debates about preserving traces of disaster for historical commemoration have emerged amid the processes of recovery and healing from the 2011 Great Tōhoku Earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear power plant disasters. Prompted by the tensions that underlie decisions about the value of maintaining damaged artifacts and structures for public memorialization, this essay introduces the forum “Japan Before Disaster Studies,” which encourages a reconsideration of “disaster heritage” as something that also maintains an active awareness of the roles of technology and science in the depths of Japan’s disaster histories. Reconstructing these roots of disaster histories should enrich a more accessible understanding of the actors, institutions, policies, and discourses connected to various disaster contexts.",
author = "Lisa Onaga and Aaron Moore",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "154--158",
journal = "Technology and Culture",
issn = "0040-165X",
publisher = "Johns Hopkins University Press",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Introduction

T2 - Searching for the historical roots of 11 March 2011

AU - Onaga, Lisa

AU - Moore, Aaron

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Debates about preserving traces of disaster for historical commemoration have emerged amid the processes of recovery and healing from the 2011 Great Tōhoku Earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear power plant disasters. Prompted by the tensions that underlie decisions about the value of maintaining damaged artifacts and structures for public memorialization, this essay introduces the forum “Japan Before Disaster Studies,” which encourages a reconsideration of “disaster heritage” as something that also maintains an active awareness of the roles of technology and science in the depths of Japan’s disaster histories. Reconstructing these roots of disaster histories should enrich a more accessible understanding of the actors, institutions, policies, and discourses connected to various disaster contexts.

AB - Debates about preserving traces of disaster for historical commemoration have emerged amid the processes of recovery and healing from the 2011 Great Tōhoku Earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear power plant disasters. Prompted by the tensions that underlie decisions about the value of maintaining damaged artifacts and structures for public memorialization, this essay introduces the forum “Japan Before Disaster Studies,” which encourages a reconsideration of “disaster heritage” as something that also maintains an active awareness of the roles of technology and science in the depths of Japan’s disaster histories. Reconstructing these roots of disaster histories should enrich a more accessible understanding of the actors, institutions, policies, and discourses connected to various disaster contexts.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85013137820&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85013137820&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 58

SP - 154

EP - 158

JO - Technology and Culture

JF - Technology and Culture

SN - 0040-165X

IS - 1

ER -