Intimate partner violence survivors and pets: Exploring practitioners’ experiences in addressing client needs

Tina O’Neil Hageman, Lisa Langenderfer-Magruder, Tamara Greene, James Williams, Jason St. Mary, Shelby Elaine McDonald, Frank R. Ascione

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Research has documented a relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and animal abuse. Literature reports that many times IPV survivors delay seeking safety because of their concern for the safety of their pets and many shelters do not provide services for their pets. There continues to be a need for evidence-based guidelines to address the needs of survivors and their pets. This exploratory study documents the experiences of IPV practitioners from community agencies serving families impacted by IPV. Focus groups were conducted identifying four overarching themes: (1) pets as members of the family, (2) inconsistencies regarding screening practices, (3) need for comprehensive safety planning, and (4) safe housing for both survivors and their pets. Implications for research, practice, and policy are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)134-145
Number of pages12
JournalFamilies in Society
Volume99
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Animal abuse
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Safe housing
  • Safety planning
  • Service use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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