Intersegmental dynamics shape joint coordination during catching in typically developing children but not in children with developmental coordination disorder

Michael J. Asmussen, Eryk P. Przysucha, Natalia Dounskaia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Factors shaping joint coordination during multijoint movements were studied using a onehanded ball-catching task. Typically developing (TD) boys between 9 and 12 yr of age, at which catching becomes consistently successful, and boys with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) of the same age participated in the study. The arm was initially stretched down. Catching was performed by flexing the shoulder and elbow and extending the wrist in the parasagittal plane. Catching success rate was substantially lower in children with DCD. Amplitudes and directions of joint motions were similar in both groups. Group differences were found in shoulder and elbow coordination patterns. TD children performed the movement predominantly by actively accelerating into flexion, one joint at a time-first the elbow and then the shoulder- and allowing passive interaction torque (IT) to accelerate the other joint into extension. Children with DCD tended to accelerate both joints into flexion simultaneously, suppressing IT. The results suggest that the TD joint coordination was shaped by the tendency to minimize active control of IT despite the complexity of the emergent joint kinematics. The inefficient control of IT in children with DCD points to deficiency of the internal model of intersegmental dynamics. Together, the findings advocate that joint coordination throughout a multijoint movement is a by-product of the control strategy that benefits from movement dynamics by actively accelerating a single joint and using IT for rotation of the other joint. Reduction of control-dependent noise is discussed as a possible advantage of this control strategy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1417-1428
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of neurophysiology
Volume111
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014

Keywords

  • Arm movements
  • Intersegmental dynamics
  • Movement planning
  • Multijoint
  • Optimal control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Intersegmental dynamics shape joint coordination during catching in typically developing children but not in children with developmental coordination disorder'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this