Intersectionality research in counseling psychology

Patrick R. Grzanka, Carlos E. Santos, Bonnie Moradi

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article introduces the special section on intersectionality research in counseling psychology. Across the 4 manuscripts that constitute this special section, a clear theme emerges: a need to return to the roots and politics of intersectionality. Importantly, the 2 empirical articles in this special section (Jerald, Cole, Ward, & Avery, 2017; Lewis, Williams, Peppers, & Gadson, 2017) are studies of Black women's experiences: a return, so to speak, to the subject positions and social locations from which intersectionality emanates. Shin et al. (2017) explore why this focus on Black feminist thought and social justice is so important by highlighting the persistent weaknesses in how much research published in leading counseling psychology journals has tended to use intersectionality as a way to talk about multiple identities, rather than as a framework for critiquing systemic, intersecting forms of oppression and privilege. Shin and colleagues also point to the possibilities intersectionality affords us when scholars realize the transformative potential of this critical framework. Answers to this call for transformative practices are foregrounded in Moradi and Grzanka's (2017) contribution, which surveys the interdisciplinary literature on intersectionality and presents a series of guidelines for using intersectionality responsibly. We close with a discussion of issues concerning the applications of intersectionality to counseling psychology research that spans beyond the contributions of each manuscript in this special section. (PsycINFO Database Record

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-457
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Counseling Psychology
Volume64
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Counseling
Manuscripts
Psychology
Research
Social Justice
Politics
Guidelines
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Intersectionality research in counseling psychology. / Grzanka, Patrick R.; Santos, Carlos E.; Moradi, Bonnie.

In: Journal of Counseling Psychology, Vol. 64, No. 5, 01.10.2017, p. 453-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Grzanka, Patrick R. ; Santos, Carlos E. ; Moradi, Bonnie. / Intersectionality research in counseling psychology. In: Journal of Counseling Psychology. 2017 ; Vol. 64, No. 5. pp. 453-457.
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