Interparental aggression and infant patterns of adrenocortical and behavioral stress responses

Nissa R. Towe-Goodman, Cynthia A. Stifter, W. Roger Mills-Koonce, Douglas A. Granger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drawing on emotional security theory, this study examined linkages between interparental aggression, infant self-regulatory behaviors, and patterns of physiological and behavioral stress responses in a diverse sample of 735 infants residing in predominately low-income, non-metropolitan communities. Latent profile analysis revealed four classes of adrenocortical and behavioral stress-response patterns at 7 months of age, using assessments of behavioral and cortisol reactivity to an emotion eliciting challenge, as well as global ratings of the child's negative affect and basal cortisol levels. The addition of covariates within the latent profile model suggested that children with more violence in the home and children who used less caregiver-oriented regulation strategies were more likely to exhibit a pattern of high cortisol reactivity with moderate signs of distress rather than the average stress response, suggesting possible patterns of adaptation in violent households.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)685-699
Number of pages15
JournalDevelopmental Psychobiology
Volume54
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aggression
Hydrocortisone
Physiological Stress
Violence
Caregivers
Emotions

Keywords

  • Cortisol
  • Emotion regulation
  • Infancy
  • Interparental aggression
  • Negative reactivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Towe-Goodman, N. R., Stifter, C. A., Mills-Koonce, W. R., & Granger, D. A. (2012). Interparental aggression and infant patterns of adrenocortical and behavioral stress responses. Developmental Psychobiology, 54(7), 685-699. https://doi.org/10.1002/dev.20618

Interparental aggression and infant patterns of adrenocortical and behavioral stress responses. / Towe-Goodman, Nissa R.; Stifter, Cynthia A.; Mills-Koonce, W. Roger; Granger, Douglas A.

In: Developmental Psychobiology, Vol. 54, No. 7, 11.2012, p. 685-699.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Towe-Goodman, NR, Stifter, CA, Mills-Koonce, WR & Granger, DA 2012, 'Interparental aggression and infant patterns of adrenocortical and behavioral stress responses', Developmental Psychobiology, vol. 54, no. 7, pp. 685-699. https://doi.org/10.1002/dev.20618
Towe-Goodman, Nissa R. ; Stifter, Cynthia A. ; Mills-Koonce, W. Roger ; Granger, Douglas A. / Interparental aggression and infant patterns of adrenocortical and behavioral stress responses. In: Developmental Psychobiology. 2012 ; Vol. 54, No. 7. pp. 685-699.
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