International justice and domestic politics: Post-Tudjman Croatia and the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia

Victor Peskin, Miecsłzysaw P. Boduszynski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

NO ISSUE HAS POLARISED the post-authoritarian Croatian political scene as much as the issue of cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). Although the pro-Western regime that came to power in January 2000 promised to reverse the anti-ICTY policies of its nationalist and authoritarian predecessor, it soon became clear that such cooperation was easier promised than delivered. Domestic political battles over whether and how much to cooperate with the United Nations tribunal based in The Hague have been intense, often dominating the media and at times sparking street demonstrations. The viability of Croatia's governing coalition and the fledgling party system have been tested frequently on the tribunal issue. Within the ruling coalition, unity has given way to internecine conflict over the terms of government policy toward the tribunal. This article aims to shed light on the politics of state cooperation with the ICTY by addressing the factors that have made the issue so volatile in Croatia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1117-1142
Number of pages26
JournalEurope - Asia Studies
Volume55
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics and Econometrics

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