Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors among Ukrainian Children: The Role of Family Communication and Maternal Coping

Viktor Burlaka, Qi Wu, Shiyou Wu, Iuliia Churakova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This study aims to explore the relationship of mother’s ways of coping with stress and family communication with the child internalizing and externalizing behaviors in Ukraine. Methods: In a cross-sectional sample of 294 mother-and-child (9–16 years of age) Ukrainian dyads, mothers answered questions from the revised Ways of Coping Checklist, FACES Family Communication scale, Child Behavior Checklist, and questions about their sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Robust regression results suggest increased internalizing behaviors were statistically associated with poor family communication (b = −.19, 95% CI [−.30, −.08], p <.01), maternal coping by accepting responsibility (b = 2.14, 95% CI [.44, 3.84], p < 0.05), escape-avoidance (b = 3.79, 95% CI [1.00, 6.58], p < 0.01), planful problem solving (b = 2.80, 95% CI [.61, 4.99], p < 0.05), child female gender (b = −2.53, 95% CI [−4.22, −.83], p <.01) and lower family income (b = −.003, 95% CI [−.006, −.0001], p <.01). Increased child externalizing behaviors were statistically associated with maternal seeking social support (b = 3.25, 95% CI [1.06, 5.43], p <.01), decreased positive reappraisal (b = −1.52, 95% CI [−2.91, −.12], p <.05), maternal unemployment (b = −2.80, 95% CI [−5.30, −.30], p <.05), poor family communication (b = −.46, 95% CI [−.59, −.34], p <.001), and child male gender (b = 3.48, 95% CI [1.53, 5.44], p <.01). Poor family communication was linked with significantly higher increase in internalizing behaviors for girls compared to boys (b =.17, 95% CI [.03,.32], p <.05). Conclusions: When examining child internalizing and externalizing behaviors it is important to consider the role of family communication and maternal coping.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

coping
Communication
Mothers
communication
Child Behavior
Checklist
Ukraine
Unemployment
gender
family income
dyad
Social Support
social support
unemployment
low income
regression
responsibility

Keywords

  • Child mental health
  • Children and families
  • Coping
  • Family communication
  • Ukraine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

@article{354011eb2ff34eb2b36012980b87d8af,
title = "Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors among Ukrainian Children: The Role of Family Communication and Maternal Coping",
abstract = "Objectives: This study aims to explore the relationship of mother’s ways of coping with stress and family communication with the child internalizing and externalizing behaviors in Ukraine. Methods: In a cross-sectional sample of 294 mother-and-child (9–16 years of age) Ukrainian dyads, mothers answered questions from the revised Ways of Coping Checklist, FACES Family Communication scale, Child Behavior Checklist, and questions about their sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Robust regression results suggest increased internalizing behaviors were statistically associated with poor family communication (b = −.19, 95{\%} CI [−.30, −.08], p <.01), maternal coping by accepting responsibility (b = 2.14, 95{\%} CI [.44, 3.84], p < 0.05), escape-avoidance (b = 3.79, 95{\%} CI [1.00, 6.58], p < 0.01), planful problem solving (b = 2.80, 95{\%} CI [.61, 4.99], p < 0.05), child female gender (b = −2.53, 95{\%} CI [−4.22, −.83], p <.01) and lower family income (b = −.003, 95{\%} CI [−.006, −.0001], p <.01). Increased child externalizing behaviors were statistically associated with maternal seeking social support (b = 3.25, 95{\%} CI [1.06, 5.43], p <.01), decreased positive reappraisal (b = −1.52, 95{\%} CI [−2.91, −.12], p <.05), maternal unemployment (b = −2.80, 95{\%} CI [−5.30, −.30], p <.05), poor family communication (b = −.46, 95{\%} CI [−.59, −.34], p <.001), and child male gender (b = 3.48, 95{\%} CI [1.53, 5.44], p <.01). Poor family communication was linked with significantly higher increase in internalizing behaviors for girls compared to boys (b =.17, 95{\%} CI [.03,.32], p <.05). Conclusions: When examining child internalizing and externalizing behaviors it is important to consider the role of family communication and maternal coping.",
keywords = "Child mental health, Children and families, Coping, Family communication, Ukraine",
author = "Viktor Burlaka and Qi Wu and Shiyou Wu and Iuliia Churakova",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10826-019-01377-w",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Child and Family Studies",
issn = "1062-1024",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors among Ukrainian Children

T2 - The Role of Family Communication and Maternal Coping

AU - Burlaka, Viktor

AU - Wu, Qi

AU - Wu, Shiyou

AU - Churakova, Iuliia

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objectives: This study aims to explore the relationship of mother’s ways of coping with stress and family communication with the child internalizing and externalizing behaviors in Ukraine. Methods: In a cross-sectional sample of 294 mother-and-child (9–16 years of age) Ukrainian dyads, mothers answered questions from the revised Ways of Coping Checklist, FACES Family Communication scale, Child Behavior Checklist, and questions about their sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Robust regression results suggest increased internalizing behaviors were statistically associated with poor family communication (b = −.19, 95% CI [−.30, −.08], p <.01), maternal coping by accepting responsibility (b = 2.14, 95% CI [.44, 3.84], p < 0.05), escape-avoidance (b = 3.79, 95% CI [1.00, 6.58], p < 0.01), planful problem solving (b = 2.80, 95% CI [.61, 4.99], p < 0.05), child female gender (b = −2.53, 95% CI [−4.22, −.83], p <.01) and lower family income (b = −.003, 95% CI [−.006, −.0001], p <.01). Increased child externalizing behaviors were statistically associated with maternal seeking social support (b = 3.25, 95% CI [1.06, 5.43], p <.01), decreased positive reappraisal (b = −1.52, 95% CI [−2.91, −.12], p <.05), maternal unemployment (b = −2.80, 95% CI [−5.30, −.30], p <.05), poor family communication (b = −.46, 95% CI [−.59, −.34], p <.001), and child male gender (b = 3.48, 95% CI [1.53, 5.44], p <.01). Poor family communication was linked with significantly higher increase in internalizing behaviors for girls compared to boys (b =.17, 95% CI [.03,.32], p <.05). Conclusions: When examining child internalizing and externalizing behaviors it is important to consider the role of family communication and maternal coping.

AB - Objectives: This study aims to explore the relationship of mother’s ways of coping with stress and family communication with the child internalizing and externalizing behaviors in Ukraine. Methods: In a cross-sectional sample of 294 mother-and-child (9–16 years of age) Ukrainian dyads, mothers answered questions from the revised Ways of Coping Checklist, FACES Family Communication scale, Child Behavior Checklist, and questions about their sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Robust regression results suggest increased internalizing behaviors were statistically associated with poor family communication (b = −.19, 95% CI [−.30, −.08], p <.01), maternal coping by accepting responsibility (b = 2.14, 95% CI [.44, 3.84], p < 0.05), escape-avoidance (b = 3.79, 95% CI [1.00, 6.58], p < 0.01), planful problem solving (b = 2.80, 95% CI [.61, 4.99], p < 0.05), child female gender (b = −2.53, 95% CI [−4.22, −.83], p <.01) and lower family income (b = −.003, 95% CI [−.006, −.0001], p <.01). Increased child externalizing behaviors were statistically associated with maternal seeking social support (b = 3.25, 95% CI [1.06, 5.43], p <.01), decreased positive reappraisal (b = −1.52, 95% CI [−2.91, −.12], p <.05), maternal unemployment (b = −2.80, 95% CI [−5.30, −.30], p <.05), poor family communication (b = −.46, 95% CI [−.59, −.34], p <.001), and child male gender (b = 3.48, 95% CI [1.53, 5.44], p <.01). Poor family communication was linked with significantly higher increase in internalizing behaviors for girls compared to boys (b =.17, 95% CI [.03,.32], p <.05). Conclusions: When examining child internalizing and externalizing behaviors it is important to consider the role of family communication and maternal coping.

KW - Child mental health

KW - Children and families

KW - Coping

KW - Family communication

KW - Ukraine

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U2 - 10.1007/s10826-019-01377-w

DO - 10.1007/s10826-019-01377-w

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JF - Journal of Child and Family Studies

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