Interaural spectral asymmetry and sensitivity to interaural time differences

Christopher A. Brown, William Yost

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Listeners' ability to discriminate interaural time difference (ITD) changes in low-frequency noise was determined as a function of differences in the noise spectra delivered to each ear. An ITD was applied to Gaussian noise, which was bandpass filtered using identical high-pass, but different low-pass cutoff frequencies across ears. Thus, one frequency region was dichotic, and a higher-frequency region monotic. ITD thresholds increased as bandwidth to one ear (i.e., monotic bandwidth) increased, despite the fact that the region of interaural spectral overlap remained constant. Results suggest that listeners can process ITD differences when the spectra at two ears are moderately different.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
    Volume130
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

    Fingerprint

    ear
    asymmetry
    sensitivity
    bandwidth
    noise spectra
    random noise
    cut-off
    low frequencies
    thresholds
    Spectrality
    Ear
    Asymmetry
    Listeners

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
    • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

    Cite this

    Interaural spectral asymmetry and sensitivity to interaural time differences. / Brown, Christopher A.; Yost, William.

    In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 130, No. 5, 01.11.2011.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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