Interaction of Type A behavior and perceived controllability of stressors on stress outcomes

Charles C. Benight, Angelo J. Kinicki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

General stress models depict stress and its related outcomes as an interaction between individual and environmental characteristics. This study focused on the interaction between the personal characteristic of Type A behavior and the environmental factor of perceived controllability of stressors on two behavioral outcomes of stress: overt exhibition of Type A behavior and task performance. One hundred and twenty-two subjects were divided into Type A B categories and randomly assigned to either a moderately or highly uncontrollable managerial in-basket simulation. Results indicated that the personal characteristic of Type A behavior had its strongest affect on the overt exhibition of Type A behavior when subjects perceived their environment as moderately uncontrollable. Results also confirmed the prediction that environmental factors dominate personal characteristics in affecting stress outcomes when the situation is perceived as highly uncontrollable. The treatment manipulations did not affect performance. Implications for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-62
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988

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interaction
environmental factors
Task Performance and Analysis
performance
manipulation
simulation
Interaction
Type A behavior
Stressors
Controllability
Personal characteristics
Environmental factors
Prediction
Simulation
Manipulation
Task performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Applied Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Interaction of Type A behavior and perceived controllability of stressors on stress outcomes. / Benight, Charles C.; Kinicki, Angelo J.

In: Journal of Vocational Behavior, Vol. 33, No. 1, 1988, p. 50-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Benight, Charles C. ; Kinicki, Angelo J. / Interaction of Type A behavior and perceived controllability of stressors on stress outcomes. In: Journal of Vocational Behavior. 1988 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 50-62.
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