Integration of Time-Based Recommendations with Current Pediatric Health Behavior Guidelines: Implications for Obesity Prevention and Treatment in Youth

Alaina P. Vidmar, Nenette A. Cáceres, Camille R. Schneider-Worthington, Celina Shirazipour, Matthew P. Buman, Kayla de la Haye, Sarah Jeanne Salvy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose of Review: Youth-onset obesity is associated with negative health outcomes across the lifespan including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, dyslipidemias, asthma, and several cancers. Pediatric health guidelines have traditionally focused on the quality and quantity of dietary intake, physical activity, and sleep. Recent Findings: Emerging evidence suggests that the timing (time of day when behavior occurs) and composition (proportion of time spent allocated to behavior) of food intake, movement (i.e., physical activity, sedentary time), and sleep may independently predict health trajectories and disease risks. Several theoretically driven interventions and conceptual frameworks feature behavior timing and composition (e.g., 24 h movement continuum, circadian science and chronobiology, intermittent fasting regimens, structured day hypothesis). These literatures are, however, disparate, with little crosstalk across disciplines. In this review, we examine dietary, sleep, and movement guidelines and recommendations for youths ages 0–18 in the context of theoretical models and empirical findings in support of time-based approaches. Summary: The review aims to inform a unifying framework of health behaviors and guide future research on the integration of time-based recommendations into current quantity and quality-based health guidelines for children and adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-253
Number of pages18
JournalCurrent obesity reports
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Dietary Intake
  • Obesity
  • Pediatrics
  • Physical activity
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

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