Integrating stand and soil properties to understand foliar nutrient dynamics during forest succession following slash-and-burn agriculture in the Bolivian Amazon

Eben N. Broadbent, Angélica M. Almeyda Zambrano, Gregory P. Asner, Marlene Soriano, Christopher B. Field, Harrison Ramos De Souza, Marielos Peña-Claros, Rachel I. Adams, Rodolfo Dirzo, Larry Giles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Secondary forests cover large areas of the tropics and play an important role in the global carbon cycle. During secondary forest succession, simultaneous changes occur among stand structural attributes, soil properties, and species composition. Most studies classify tree species into categories based on their regeneration requirements. We use a high-resolution secondary forest chronosequence to assign trees to a continuous gradient in species successional status assigned according to their distribution across the chronosequence. Species successional status, not stand age or differences in stand structure or soil properties, was found to be the best predictor of leaf trait variation. Foliar δ13C had a significant positive relationship with species successional status, indicating changes in foliar physiology related to growth and competitive strategy, but was not correlated with stand age, whereas soil δ13C dynamics were largely constrained by plant species composition. Foliar δ15N had a significant negative correlation with both stand age and species successional status, - most likely resulting from a large initial biomass-burning enrichment in soil 15N and 13C and not closure of the nitrogen cycle. Foliar %C was neither correlated with stand age nor species successional status but was found to display significant phylogenetic signal. Results from this study are relevant to understanding the dynamics of tree species growth and competition during forest succession and highlight possibilities of, and potentially confounding signals affecting, the utility of leaf traits to understand community and species dynamics during secondary forest succession.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere86042
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 7 2014
Externally publishedYes

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forest succession
shifting cultivation
secondary forests
Agriculture
Burns
Nutrients
soil properties
Soil
Soils
Food
chronosequences
nutrients
age of soil
Tropics
species diversity
Nitrogen Cycle
stand structure
Physiology
Carbon Cycle
Chemical analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Integrating stand and soil properties to understand foliar nutrient dynamics during forest succession following slash-and-burn agriculture in the Bolivian Amazon. / Broadbent, Eben N.; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M.; Asner, Gregory P.; Soriano, Marlene; Field, Christopher B.; De Souza, Harrison Ramos; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Adams, Rachel I.; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Giles, Larry.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 2, e86042, 07.02.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Broadbent, EN, Almeyda Zambrano, AM, Asner, GP, Soriano, M, Field, CB, De Souza, HR, Peña-Claros, M, Adams, RI, Dirzo, R & Giles, L 2014, 'Integrating stand and soil properties to understand foliar nutrient dynamics during forest succession following slash-and-burn agriculture in the Bolivian Amazon', PloS one, vol. 9, no. 2, e86042. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0086042
Broadbent, Eben N. ; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica M. ; Asner, Gregory P. ; Soriano, Marlene ; Field, Christopher B. ; De Souza, Harrison Ramos ; Peña-Claros, Marielos ; Adams, Rachel I. ; Dirzo, Rodolfo ; Giles, Larry. / Integrating stand and soil properties to understand foliar nutrient dynamics during forest succession following slash-and-burn agriculture in the Bolivian Amazon. In: PloS one. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 2.
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