Integrating personality and social networks

A meta-analysis of personality, network position, and work outcomes in organizations

Ruolian Fang, Blaine Landis, Zhen Zhang, Marc H. Anderson, Jason D. Shaw, Martin Kilduff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using data from 138 independent samples, we meta-analytically examined three research questions concerning the roles of personality and network position in organizations. First, how do different personality characteristics-selfmonitoring and the Big Five personality traits-relate to indegree centrality and brokerage, the two most studied structurally advantageous positions in organizational networks? Second, how do indegree centrality and brokerage compare in explaining job performance and career success? Third, how do these personality variables and network positions relate to work outcomes? Our results show that self-monitoring predicted indegree centrality (across expressive and instrumental networks) and brokerage (in expressive networks) after controlling for the Big Five traits. Self-monitoring, therefore, was especially relevant for understanding why people differ in their acquisition of advantageous positions in social networks. But the total variance explained by personality ranged between 3% and 5%. Surprisingly, we found that indegree centrality was more strongly related to job performance and career success than brokerage. We also found that personality predicted job performance and career success above and beyond network position and that network position partially mediated the effects of certain personality variables on work outcomes. This paper provides an integrated view of how an individual's personality and network position combine to influence job performance and career success.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1243-1260
Number of pages18
JournalOrganization Science
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Monitoring
Work outcomes
Social networks
Meta-analysis
Job performance
Brokerage
Career success
Centrality
Self-monitoring
Big Five

Keywords

  • Big Five personality traits
  • Brokerage
  • Indegree centrality
  • Meta-analysis
  • Network position
  • Personality
  • Self-monitoring
  • Social networks
  • Structural holes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

Integrating personality and social networks : A meta-analysis of personality, network position, and work outcomes in organizations. / Fang, Ruolian; Landis, Blaine; Zhang, Zhen; Anderson, Marc H.; Shaw, Jason D.; Kilduff, Martin.

In: Organization Science, Vol. 26, No. 4, 2015, p. 1243-1260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fang, Ruolian ; Landis, Blaine ; Zhang, Zhen ; Anderson, Marc H. ; Shaw, Jason D. ; Kilduff, Martin. / Integrating personality and social networks : A meta-analysis of personality, network position, and work outcomes in organizations. In: Organization Science. 2015 ; Vol. 26, No. 4. pp. 1243-1260.
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