Integrating Games Into the Artworld

A Methodology and Case Study Exploring the Work of Jason Rohrer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The game designer Jason Rohrer has self-identified as an artist. By doing so enters his work into a critique process that, according to James Elkins, dates back to the Romantic period in which artists are evaluated by peers on an individualized basis according to the ideals and creative direction they produce in the form of written and verbal artifacts. Arthur Danto calls these artifacts “artistic identification” in his essay, “The Artworld,” written in 1964. The study applies this critique method to Rohrer’s work in the game medium and asks how it fares when subjected to what Howard Becker calls, “a continuous process of selection” through critique. It asks, finally, how can knowing this methodology help to elucidate the path for the eventual full-fledged integration of games into the Artworld.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)671-695
Number of pages25
JournalGames and Culture
Volume12
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

artist
artifact
Artifacts
methodology
pricing
Methodology
Artworld
Artifact
Artist
Romantic Period
Ideal
Peers
Creative Direction
Arthur Danto
Designer
Direction compound

Keywords

  • aesthetics
  • art critique
  • Arthur Danto
  • Artworld
  • games as art
  • Howard Becker
  • integration
  • Jason Rohrer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication
  • Anthropology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Human-Computer Interaction

Cite this

Integrating Games Into the Artworld : A Methodology and Case Study Exploring the Work of Jason Rohrer. / Devine, Theresa.

In: Games and Culture, Vol. 12, No. 7-8, 01.11.2017, p. 671-695.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{aff7f6f6df15481f94ed27c5ec7e95f1,
title = "Integrating Games Into the Artworld: A Methodology and Case Study Exploring the Work of Jason Rohrer",
abstract = "The game designer Jason Rohrer has self-identified as an artist. By doing so enters his work into a critique process that, according to James Elkins, dates back to the Romantic period in which artists are evaluated by peers on an individualized basis according to the ideals and creative direction they produce in the form of written and verbal artifacts. Arthur Danto calls these artifacts “artistic identification” in his essay, “The Artworld,” written in 1964. The study applies this critique method to Rohrer’s work in the game medium and asks how it fares when subjected to what Howard Becker calls, “a continuous process of selection” through critique. It asks, finally, how can knowing this methodology help to elucidate the path for the eventual full-fledged integration of games into the Artworld.",
keywords = "aesthetics, art critique, Arthur Danto, Artworld, games as art, Howard Becker, integration, Jason Rohrer",
author = "Theresa Devine",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1555412015596105",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "671--695",
journal = "Games and Culture",
issn = "1555-4120",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "7-8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Integrating Games Into the Artworld

T2 - A Methodology and Case Study Exploring the Work of Jason Rohrer

AU - Devine, Theresa

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - The game designer Jason Rohrer has self-identified as an artist. By doing so enters his work into a critique process that, according to James Elkins, dates back to the Romantic period in which artists are evaluated by peers on an individualized basis according to the ideals and creative direction they produce in the form of written and verbal artifacts. Arthur Danto calls these artifacts “artistic identification” in his essay, “The Artworld,” written in 1964. The study applies this critique method to Rohrer’s work in the game medium and asks how it fares when subjected to what Howard Becker calls, “a continuous process of selection” through critique. It asks, finally, how can knowing this methodology help to elucidate the path for the eventual full-fledged integration of games into the Artworld.

AB - The game designer Jason Rohrer has self-identified as an artist. By doing so enters his work into a critique process that, according to James Elkins, dates back to the Romantic period in which artists are evaluated by peers on an individualized basis according to the ideals and creative direction they produce in the form of written and verbal artifacts. Arthur Danto calls these artifacts “artistic identification” in his essay, “The Artworld,” written in 1964. The study applies this critique method to Rohrer’s work in the game medium and asks how it fares when subjected to what Howard Becker calls, “a continuous process of selection” through critique. It asks, finally, how can knowing this methodology help to elucidate the path for the eventual full-fledged integration of games into the Artworld.

KW - aesthetics

KW - art critique

KW - Arthur Danto

KW - Artworld

KW - games as art

KW - Howard Becker

KW - integration

KW - Jason Rohrer

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85038032006&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85038032006&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1555412015596105

DO - 10.1177/1555412015596105

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 671

EP - 695

JO - Games and Culture

JF - Games and Culture

SN - 1555-4120

IS - 7-8

ER -