Institutionalized social skill and the rise of mediating organizations in urban governance: The case of the Cleveland Housing Network

Michael McQuarrie, Norman Krumholz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper we build on an expanding literature that attempts to understand the changing organizational and institutional dimensions of contemporary urban governance. We do so by utilizing the Cleveland Housing Network as a lens through which salient characteristics of contemporary governance become visible. Doing so enables us to highlight the distinctive challenges of the multi-institutional nature of contemporary governance arrangements and "heterarchic" governance in particular. These challenges situate mediating organizations as central components of governance arrangements. Finally, by focusing on the distinctive characteristics of the organization's leaders, we demonstrate that mediating organizations are usefully thought of as institutionalized forms of the "social skill" of institutional entrepreneurs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-442
Number of pages22
JournalHousing Policy Debate
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Development
  • Low-income housing
  • Nonprofit sector
  • Policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Urban Studies
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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