Instittutional attachments and self-control: Understanding deviance among Hispanic adolescents

Lorna L. Alvarez-Rivera, Kathleen Talbot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study tested the ability of the general theory of crime and social control theory to account for self-reported deviance among a sample of 298 Puerto Rican high school students. The following hypotheses were examined: (1) Low attachment levels (to parents, religion, school, and friends) will positively and significantly predict deviance, (2) Individual with low levels of self-control will be more likely to report involvement in deviance, and (3) Low self-control will mediate the relationship between attachments (parents, religion, school, and friends) and deviance. Results indicated support for social control theory and did not support the general theory of crime. Self-control was not significantly predictive of deviance whereas many of the institutional attachment variables were important predictors of deviance among Hispanic high school students (attachment to parents, school, and friends). Theoretical and policy implications of the findings supportive of social control theory are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)666-674
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

self-control
deviant behavior
Hispanic Americans
adolescent
control theory
social control
Parents
Religion
Crime
parents
school
Students
offense
Aptitude
Self-Control
student
ability
Social Theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Law
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Instittutional attachments and self-control : Understanding deviance among Hispanic adolescents. / Alvarez-Rivera, Lorna L.; Talbot, Kathleen.

In: Journal of Criminal Justice, Vol. 38, No. 4, 07.2010, p. 666-674.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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