Insomnia treatment acceptability and preferences of male Iraq and Afghanistan combat Veterans and their healthcare providers

Dana Epstein, Judith L. Babcock-Parziale, Patricia L. Haynes, Christine A. Herb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sleep difficulty is a prevalent problem among returning Veterans. Although there is strong evidence for the efficacy and durability of cognitive-behavioral treatment for insomnia (CBT-I) in the general population, the interventions require motivation, attention, and adherence from patients to achieve successful outcomes. Given the unique characteristics of Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) Veterans who have experienced blast-related injuries and other trauma, CBT-I for these patients may require modification, including alternative delivery methods, to ensure effective implementation and positive outcomes. We interviewed 18 OIF/OEF Veterans who screened positive for mild traumatic brain injury and 19 healthcare providers to determine the acceptability of insomnia treatments and preferences for the interventions and treatment delivery. Veterans and providers had distinct preferences for insomnia treatment and its delivery. The treatments the Veterans found most acceptable were also the ones they preferred: relaxation treatment and pharmacotherapy. The providers identified relaxation therapy as the most acceptable treatment. Veterans preferred the individual treatment format as well as electronic methods of treatment delivery. Despite some differences between patients and providers, a compromise through modification of empirically supported behavioral treatments is feasible, and implications for preference-based insomnia intervention development and testing are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)867-878
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 9 2012

Fingerprint

Afghanistan
Iraq
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Veterans
Health Personnel
2003-2011 Iraq War
Afghan Campaign 2001-
Therapeutics
Brain Concussion
Blast Injuries
Relaxation Therapy
Patient Compliance
Motivation
Sleep

Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavioral treatment
  • Healthcare provid-ers
  • Insomnia
  • OIF/OEF veterans
  • Pharmacotherapy
  • Poly-trauma
  • Sleep
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Treatment acceptability
  • Treatment preference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Insomnia treatment acceptability and preferences of male Iraq and Afghanistan combat Veterans and their healthcare providers. / Epstein, Dana; Babcock-Parziale, Judith L.; Haynes, Patricia L.; Herb, Christine A.

In: Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Vol. 49, No. 6, 09.11.2012, p. 867-878.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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