Insights from vocational and career developmental theories: Their potential contributions for advancing the understanding of employee turnover

Peter Hom, T. L Leong Frederick, Juliya Golubovich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

This chapter applies three of the most prominent theories in vocational and career psychology to further illuminate the turnover process. Prevailing theories about attrition have rarely integrated explanatory constructs from vocational research, though career (and job) choices clearly have implications for employee affect and loyalty to a chosen job in a career field. Despite remarkable inroads by new perspectives for explaining turnover, career, and vocational formulations can nonetheless enrich these - and conventional - formulations about why incumbents stay or leave their jobs. To illustrate, vocational theories can help clarify why certain shocks (critical events precipitating thoughts of leaving) drive attrition and what embeds incumbents. In particular, this chapter reviews Super's life-span career theory, Holland's career model, and social cognitive career theory and describes how they can fill in theoretical gaps in the understanding of organizational withdrawal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-165
Number of pages51
JournalResearch in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Volume29
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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