Infrared microspectroscopy combined with conventional atomic force microscopy

B. Kwon, M. V. Schulmerich, L. J. Elgass, R. Kong, S. E. Holton, R. Bhargava, W. P. King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports nanotopography and mid infrared (IR) microspectroscopic imaging coupled within the same atomic force microscope (AFM). The reported advances are enabled by using a bimaterial microcantilever, conventionally used for standard AFM imaging, as a detector of monochromatic IR light. IR light intensity is recorded as thermomechanical bending of the cantilever measured upon illumination with intensity-modulated, narrowband radiation. The cantilever bending is then correlated with the sample's IR absorption. Spatial resolution was characterized by imaging a USAF 1951 optical resolution target made of SU-8 photoresist. The spatial resolution of the AFM topography measurement was a few nanometers as expected, while the spatial resolution of the IR measurement was 24.4μm using relatively coarse spectral resolution (25-125cm-1). In addition to well-controlled samples demonstrating the spatial and spectral properties of the setup, we used the method to map engineered skin and three-dimensional cell culture samples. This research combines modest IR imaging capabilities with the exceptional topographical imaging of conventional AFM to provide advantages of both in a facile manner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-61
Number of pages6
JournalUltramicroscopy
Volume116
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Atomic force microscopy
Microscopes
microscopes
atomic force microscopy
Infrared radiation
spatial resolution
Infrared imaging
Imaging techniques
Spectral resolution
Infrared absorption
Photoresists
Cell culture
photoresists
spectral resolution
Topography
luminous intensity
infrared absorption
narrowband
Skin
topography

Keywords

  • Bimaterial
  • FT-IR spectroscopy
  • Infrared
  • Microcantilever
  • Monochromator
  • Photothermal
  • Spatial resolution
  • Spectral resolution
  • Thermomechanical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Kwon, B., Schulmerich, M. V., Elgass, L. J., Kong, R., Holton, S. E., Bhargava, R., & King, W. P. (2012). Infrared microspectroscopy combined with conventional atomic force microscopy. Ultramicroscopy, 116, 56-61. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2012.03.007

Infrared microspectroscopy combined with conventional atomic force microscopy. / Kwon, B.; Schulmerich, M. V.; Elgass, L. J.; Kong, R.; Holton, S. E.; Bhargava, R.; King, W. P.

In: Ultramicroscopy, Vol. 116, 01.05.2012, p. 56-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kwon, B, Schulmerich, MV, Elgass, LJ, Kong, R, Holton, SE, Bhargava, R & King, WP 2012, 'Infrared microspectroscopy combined with conventional atomic force microscopy', Ultramicroscopy, vol. 116, pp. 56-61. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultramic.2012.03.007
Kwon, B. ; Schulmerich, M. V. ; Elgass, L. J. ; Kong, R. ; Holton, S. E. ; Bhargava, R. ; King, W. P. / Infrared microspectroscopy combined with conventional atomic force microscopy. In: Ultramicroscopy. 2012 ; Vol. 116. pp. 56-61.
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