INFORMANT ACCURACY IN SOCIAL NETWORK DATA II

Harvey Bernard, PETER D. KILLWORTH

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

139 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper repeats and confirms the results of Kill worth and Bernard (1976), concerning informants'ability to report their communication accurately. A variety of self‐monitoring, or nearly self‐monitoring, networks are used for this study. The conclusion again appears that people do not know, with any accuracy, those with whom they communicate. The expanded experimental design permits a variety of other, related questions to be answered: recall of past communication is not significantly more accurate than prediction of future communication; no one set of data is more accurate than any other; the maintenance of personal logs of communication does not improve accuracy; informants do not know if they are accurate or not; there is no reason to choose either rankings or scalings as a data instrument save for convenience. It is suggested that future research should concentrate both on improving the accuracy of data‐gathering instruments and on lessening the reliance of data‐processing instruments on precise data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-18
Number of pages16
JournalHuman Communication Research
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1977
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Social Support
social network
Communication
communication
Aptitude
scaling
Design of experiments
ranking
Research Design
ability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Anthropology
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

INFORMANT ACCURACY IN SOCIAL NETWORK DATA II. / Bernard, Harvey; KILLWORTH, PETER D.

In: Human Communication Research, Vol. 4, No. 1, 01.01.1977, p. 3-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bernard, Harvey ; KILLWORTH, PETER D. / INFORMANT ACCURACY IN SOCIAL NETWORK DATA II. In: Human Communication Research. 1977 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 3-18.
@article{0b9f1b14f8a64c27b6e381356c82f2f0,
title = "INFORMANT ACCURACY IN SOCIAL NETWORK DATA II",
abstract = "This paper repeats and confirms the results of Kill worth and Bernard (1976), concerning informants'ability to report their communication accurately. A variety of self‐monitoring, or nearly self‐monitoring, networks are used for this study. The conclusion again appears that people do not know, with any accuracy, those with whom they communicate. The expanded experimental design permits a variety of other, related questions to be answered: recall of past communication is not significantly more accurate than prediction of future communication; no one set of data is more accurate than any other; the maintenance of personal logs of communication does not improve accuracy; informants do not know if they are accurate or not; there is no reason to choose either rankings or scalings as a data instrument save for convenience. It is suggested that future research should concentrate both on improving the accuracy of data‐gathering instruments and on lessening the reliance of data‐processing instruments on precise data.",
author = "Harvey Bernard and KILLWORTH, {PETER D.}",
year = "1977",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1468-2958.1977.tb00591.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "3--18",
journal = "Human Communication Research",
issn = "0360-3989",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - INFORMANT ACCURACY IN SOCIAL NETWORK DATA II

AU - Bernard, Harvey

AU - KILLWORTH, PETER D.

PY - 1977/1/1

Y1 - 1977/1/1

N2 - This paper repeats and confirms the results of Kill worth and Bernard (1976), concerning informants'ability to report their communication accurately. A variety of self‐monitoring, or nearly self‐monitoring, networks are used for this study. The conclusion again appears that people do not know, with any accuracy, those with whom they communicate. The expanded experimental design permits a variety of other, related questions to be answered: recall of past communication is not significantly more accurate than prediction of future communication; no one set of data is more accurate than any other; the maintenance of personal logs of communication does not improve accuracy; informants do not know if they are accurate or not; there is no reason to choose either rankings or scalings as a data instrument save for convenience. It is suggested that future research should concentrate both on improving the accuracy of data‐gathering instruments and on lessening the reliance of data‐processing instruments on precise data.

AB - This paper repeats and confirms the results of Kill worth and Bernard (1976), concerning informants'ability to report their communication accurately. A variety of self‐monitoring, or nearly self‐monitoring, networks are used for this study. The conclusion again appears that people do not know, with any accuracy, those with whom they communicate. The expanded experimental design permits a variety of other, related questions to be answered: recall of past communication is not significantly more accurate than prediction of future communication; no one set of data is more accurate than any other; the maintenance of personal logs of communication does not improve accuracy; informants do not know if they are accurate or not; there is no reason to choose either rankings or scalings as a data instrument save for convenience. It is suggested that future research should concentrate both on improving the accuracy of data‐gathering instruments and on lessening the reliance of data‐processing instruments on precise data.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84987539036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84987539036&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1468-2958.1977.tb00591.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1468-2958.1977.tb00591.x

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84987539036

VL - 4

SP - 3

EP - 18

JO - Human Communication Research

JF - Human Communication Research

SN - 0360-3989

IS - 1

ER -