Influenza vaccination of health care workers: Evaluation of factors that are important in acceptance

Bradley Doebbeling, Michael B. Edmond, Charles S. Davis, James R. Woodin, Rodney R. Zeitler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. We evaluated the associations between putative occupational and epidemiologic determinants and influenza vaccine acceptance among health care workers during two consecutive seasons. Methods. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to identify predictors of vaccine acceptance during 1991-1992, then validated in the subsequent year. A combined repeated- measures regression model using generalized estimating equations was fit to examine workers' vaccine acceptance over the 2-year period. Results. Nearly one-third of hospital employees received influenza vaccine each year [2,364 of 7,320 (32%) in 1991-1992 vs 2,679 of 8,632 (31%) in 1992-1993]. Independent predictors among nurse clinicians included older age, higher salary, longer employment, and minimal absenteeism. Female sex, marriage, higher salary, and employment duration were independent predictors for professional support staff. Older age was the only independent predictor among nonprofessional staff. Conclusions. We conclude that older individuals, those with higher socioeconomic status, and those employed longer are more likely to accept the influenza vaccine. Sex, marital status, and prior work absenteeism are also important predictors in specific groups of health care workers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-77
Number of pages10
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Influenza Vaccines
Human Influenza
Absenteeism
Vaccination
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Delivery of Health Care
Vaccines
Logistic Models
Epidemiologic Factors
Nurse Clinicians
Marital Status
Marriage
Social Class

Keywords

  • epidemiologic methods
  • health behavior
  • health care workers
  • influenza vaccine
  • socioeconomic status
  • vaccine acceptance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Influenza vaccination of health care workers : Evaluation of factors that are important in acceptance. / Doebbeling, Bradley; Edmond, Michael B.; Davis, Charles S.; Woodin, James R.; Zeitler, Rodney R.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.1997, p. 68-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Doebbeling, Bradley ; Edmond, Michael B. ; Davis, Charles S. ; Woodin, James R. ; Zeitler, Rodney R. / Influenza vaccination of health care workers : Evaluation of factors that are important in acceptance. In: Preventive Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 68-77.
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