Influenza and pneumonia mortality in 66 large cities in the United States in years surrounding the 1918 pandemic

Rodolfo Acuna-Soto, Cécile Viboud, Gerardo Chowell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The 1918 influenza pandemic was a major epidemiological event of the twentieth century resulting in at least twenty million deaths worldwide; however, despite its historical, epidemiological, and biological relevance, it remains poorly understood. Here we examine the relationship between annual pneumonia and influenza death rates in the pre-pandemic (1910-17) and pandemic (1918-20) periods and the scaling of mortality with latitude, longitude and population size, using data from 66 large cities of the United States. The mean pre-pandemic pneumonia death rates were highly associated with pneumonia death rates during the pandemic period (Spearman ρ = 0.64-0.72; P<0.001). By contrast, there was a weak correlation between pre-pandemic and pandemic influenza mortality rates. Pneumonia mortality rates partially explained influenza mortality rates in 1918 (ρ = 0.34, P = 0.005) but not during any other year. Pneumonia death counts followed a linear relationship with population size in all study years, suggesting that pneumonia death rates were homogeneous across the range of population sizes studied. By contrast, influenza death counts followed a power law relationship with a scaling exponent of ~0.81 (95%CI: 0.71, 0.91) in 1918, suggesting that smaller cities experienced worst outcomes during the pandemic. A linear relationship was observed for all other years. Our study suggests that mortality associated with the 1918-20 influenza pandemic was in part predetermined by pre-pandemic pneumonia death rates in 66 large US cities, perhaps through the impact of the physical and social structure of each city. Smaller cities suffered a disproportionately high per capita influenza mortality burden than larger ones in 1918, while city size did not affect pneumonia mortality rates in the pre-pandemic and pandemic periods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere23467
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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Pandemics
pandemic
influenza
Human Influenza
pneumonia
Pneumonia
Mortality
Population Density
population size
death
longitude
social structure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Influenza and pneumonia mortality in 66 large cities in the United States in years surrounding the 1918 pandemic. / Acuna-Soto, Rodolfo; Viboud, Cécile; Chowell, Gerardo.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 8, e23467, 2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Acuna-Soto, Rodolfo ; Viboud, Cécile ; Chowell, Gerardo. / Influenza and pneumonia mortality in 66 large cities in the United States in years surrounding the 1918 pandemic. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 8.
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