Influences on male college students’ patient-provider communications and uptake behaviors related to the human papillomavirus vaccine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: We assessed the psychosocial influences on college males’ human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine patient-provider communication and their uptake of one or more HPV vaccine doses. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey with college males attending one large southwestern university. We used logistic regressions to explore the relationships between psychosocial and demographic variables on patient-provider communication and HPV vaccine uptake. Results: Patient-provider communication had the most significant influence on HPV vaccine uptake. However, most college males reported never discussing the HPV vaccine with their healthcare providers. HPV vaccine awareness, perceived subjective norms to vaccinate, and behavioral control to talk to healthcare providers about the vaccine significantly influenced college males’ patient-provider communication and vaccine uptake. Conclusion: HPV vaccine awareness, perceived behavioral control to communicate about the vaccine, and subjective norms to vaccinate are all addressable factors that influence HPV vaccine communication and uptake. Future intervention work should specifically target these factors for college men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of American College Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • HPV vaccine
  • human papillomavirus
  • males
  • patient-provider communication
  • theory of planned behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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