Influence of Particle Size and Loading on Particle Accessibility in Electrospun Poly(ethylene oxide) and ZIF-8 Composite Fibers: Experiments and Theory

Mitchell Armstrong, Christopher Balzer, Bohan Shan, Bin Mu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Developing electrospun nanofiber/nanoparticle composites (ENNCs) is an emerging strategy for immobilizing functional particles for a variety of applications. The radial location of the particle along the fiber, either at the surface or in the bulk, has implication into the resulting properties. To explore particle location along fibers, ZIF-8 impregnated poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) nanofibers are formed by electrospinning particle suspensions. Fibers impregnated with two different ZIF-8 particle sizes (200 nm and 12.5 μm) were electrospun and shown by nitrogen porosimetry to be nearly completely wrapped by PEO in each case at loadings near 10 wt %. This was favorably compared to developed theory of polymeric membrane encapsulated particles and extended to other electrospun fiber/particle composites through a brief literature review. ENNCs with varying loadings of nanosized ZIF-8 particles were then fabricated and tested with nitrogen porosimetry to find that the particles became available for adsorption at the surface of the fibers starting from 25 wt % (28 vol %) loading. This suggests that the particles are kinetically trapped at this loading level since, if allowed to exhibit random close-packing, the ZIF-8 would be expected to fully imbedded inside the fibers up to 56 vol % loading.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9066-9072
Number of pages7
JournalLangmuir
Volume33
Issue number36
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 12 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Spectroscopy
  • Electrochemistry

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