Inferring climate from angiosperm leaf venation networks

Benjamin Blonder, Brian J. Enquist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Leaf venation networks provide an integrative linkage between plant form, function and climate niche, because leaf water transport underlies variation in plant performance. Here, we develop theory based on leaf physiology that uses community-mean vein density to predict growing season temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The key assumption is that leaf water supply is matched to water demand in the local environment. We test model predictions using leaves from 17 temperate and tropical sites that span broad climatic gradients. We find quantitative agreement between predicted and observed climate values. We also highlight additional leaf traits that may improve predictions. Our study provides a novel approach for understanding the functional linkages between functional traits and climate that may improve the reconstruction of paleoclimate from fossil assemblages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-126
Number of pages11
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume204
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Angiosperms
Climate
Angiospermae
climate
leaves
Water
Water Supply
Veins
Temperature
prediction
plant architecture
plant veins
water supply
niches
physiology
fossils
water
growing season
temperature

Keywords

  • Functional trait
  • Leaf hydraulics
  • Leaf venation network
  • Paleoclimate reconstruction
  • Vein density

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Inferring climate from angiosperm leaf venation networks. / Blonder, Benjamin; Enquist, Brian J.

In: New Phytologist, Vol. 204, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 116-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blonder, Benjamin ; Enquist, Brian J. / Inferring climate from angiosperm leaf venation networks. In: New Phytologist. 2014 ; Vol. 204, No. 1. pp. 116-126.
@article{e01ddac8ee7b4d7bbaae1daa2941de62,
title = "Inferring climate from angiosperm leaf venation networks",
abstract = "Leaf venation networks provide an integrative linkage between plant form, function and climate niche, because leaf water transport underlies variation in plant performance. Here, we develop theory based on leaf physiology that uses community-mean vein density to predict growing season temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The key assumption is that leaf water supply is matched to water demand in the local environment. We test model predictions using leaves from 17 temperate and tropical sites that span broad climatic gradients. We find quantitative agreement between predicted and observed climate values. We also highlight additional leaf traits that may improve predictions. Our study provides a novel approach for understanding the functional linkages between functional traits and climate that may improve the reconstruction of paleoclimate from fossil assemblages.",
keywords = "Functional trait, Leaf hydraulics, Leaf venation network, Paleoclimate reconstruction, Vein density",
author = "Benjamin Blonder and Enquist, {Brian J.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/nph.12780",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "204",
pages = "116--126",
journal = "New Phytologist",
issn = "0028-646X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inferring climate from angiosperm leaf venation networks

AU - Blonder, Benjamin

AU - Enquist, Brian J.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Leaf venation networks provide an integrative linkage between plant form, function and climate niche, because leaf water transport underlies variation in plant performance. Here, we develop theory based on leaf physiology that uses community-mean vein density to predict growing season temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The key assumption is that leaf water supply is matched to water demand in the local environment. We test model predictions using leaves from 17 temperate and tropical sites that span broad climatic gradients. We find quantitative agreement between predicted and observed climate values. We also highlight additional leaf traits that may improve predictions. Our study provides a novel approach for understanding the functional linkages between functional traits and climate that may improve the reconstruction of paleoclimate from fossil assemblages.

AB - Leaf venation networks provide an integrative linkage between plant form, function and climate niche, because leaf water transport underlies variation in plant performance. Here, we develop theory based on leaf physiology that uses community-mean vein density to predict growing season temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The key assumption is that leaf water supply is matched to water demand in the local environment. We test model predictions using leaves from 17 temperate and tropical sites that span broad climatic gradients. We find quantitative agreement between predicted and observed climate values. We also highlight additional leaf traits that may improve predictions. Our study provides a novel approach for understanding the functional linkages between functional traits and climate that may improve the reconstruction of paleoclimate from fossil assemblages.

KW - Functional trait

KW - Leaf hydraulics

KW - Leaf venation network

KW - Paleoclimate reconstruction

KW - Vein density

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84906794216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84906794216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/nph.12780

DO - 10.1111/nph.12780

M3 - Article

C2 - 24725225

AN - SCOPUS:84906794216

VL - 204

SP - 116

EP - 126

JO - New Phytologist

JF - New Phytologist

SN - 0028-646X

IS - 1

ER -