Induction of attachment-independent biofilm formation and repression of hfq expression by low-fluid-shear culture of Staphylococcus aureus

Sarah L. Castro, Mayra Nelman-Gonzalez, Cheryl Nickerson, C. Mark Ott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus encounters a wide variety of fluid shear levels within the human host, and they may play a key role in dictating whether this organism adopts a commensal interaction with the host or transitions to cause disease. By using rotating-wall vessel bioreactors to create a physiologically relevant, low-fluid-shear environment, S. aureus was evaluated for cellular responses that could impact its colonization and virulence. S. aureus cells grown in a low-fluid-shear environment initiated a novel attachment-independent biofilm phenotype and were completely encased in extracellular polymeric substances. Compared to controls, low-shear-cultured cells displayed slower growth and repressed virulence characteristics, including decreased carotenoid production, increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, and reduced survival in whole blood. Transcriptional whole-genome microarray profiling suggested alterations in metabolic pathways. Further genetic expression analysis revealed downregulation of the RNA chaperone Hfq, which parallels low-fluid-shear responses of certain Gram-negative organisms. This is the first study to report an Hfq association with fluid shear in a Gram-positive organism, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved response to fluid shear among structurally diverse prokaryotes. Collectively, our results suggest S. aureus responds to a low-fluid-shear environment by initiating a biofilm/colonization phenotype with diminished virulence characteristics, which could lead to insight into key factors influencing the divergence between infection and colonization during the initial host-pathogen interaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6368-6378
Number of pages11
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume77
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

Fingerprint

Biofilms
biofilm
shears
Staphylococcus aureus
Virulence
fluid
virulence
Phenotype
Host-Pathogen Interactions
colonization
Bioreactors
Carotenoids
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
phenotype
Cultured Cells
organisms
Oxidative Stress
Down-Regulation
Genome
RNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Induction of attachment-independent biofilm formation and repression of hfq expression by low-fluid-shear culture of Staphylococcus aureus. / Castro, Sarah L.; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra; Nickerson, Cheryl; Ott, C. Mark.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 77, No. 18, 09.2011, p. 6368-6378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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