Induction of a reproductive-specific cuticular hydrocarbon profile by a juvenile hormone analog in the termite Zootermopsis nevadensis

Colin S. Brent, Clint Penick, Beth Trobaugh, Dani Moore, Juergen Liebig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Establishment and maintenance of the reproductive division of labor within social insect colonies relies on clear communication between nestmates. Fertile members convey their status to prevent others from becoming reproductively active. Recent findings in some basal termites indicate that cuticular hydrocarbon profiles may indicate reproductive state, but there is little evidence to show a direct link between reproductive status and hydrocarbon production—a prerequisite for an “honest” fertility signal. Here, we report that the putative signaling mechanism is influenced by juvenile hormone (JH), a primary regulator of gonadal development and activity in insects. Topical application of a JH-analog (pyriproxyfen) to reproductively inactive alates of the basal dampwood termite Zootermopsis nevadensis induced both females and males to express significantly more of a reproductive-specific hydrocarbon (6,9,17-tritriacontatriene). However, the JH-analog did not significantly enhance gonadal development or activity in treated termites beyond what is usually observed in maturing alates released from the inhibitory stimuli of their natal nest. These results suggest that a rise in JH following disinhibition drives the expression of reproductive-specific hydrocarbons, but that an individual’s hydrocarbon profile is not directly linked to its gonadal state. Rather than directly driving the expression of reproductive-specific hydrocarbons, the gonads may act indirectly through their influence on circulating JH.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalChemoecology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Aug 6 2016

Fingerprint

Zootermopsis nevadensis
Isoptera
Juvenile Hormones
juvenile hormone analogs
termite
Hydrocarbons
hormone
hydrocarbons
hydrocarbon
juvenile hormones
pyriproxyfen
Insects
dampwood termites
insect colonies
reproductive status
polyethism
social insect
labor division
social insects
topical application

Keywords

  • Cuticular hydrocarbons
  • Fertility signaling
  • Gonads
  • Juvenile hormone
  • Termites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Induction of a reproductive-specific cuticular hydrocarbon profile by a juvenile hormone analog in the termite Zootermopsis nevadensis. / Brent, Colin S.; Penick, Clint; Trobaugh, Beth; Moore, Dani; Liebig, Juergen.

In: Chemoecology, 06.08.2016, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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