Individual investors and local bias

Mark Seasholes, Ning Zhu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

145 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The paper tests whether individuals have value-relevant information about local stocks (where " local" is defined as being headquartered near where an investor lives). Our methodology uses two types of calendar-time portfolios-one based on holdings and one based on transactions. Portfolios of local holdings do not generate abnormal performance (alphas are zero). When studying transactions, purchases of local stocks significantly underperform sales of local stocks. The underperformance remains when focusing on stocks with potentially high levels of information asymmetries. We conclude that individuals do not help incorporate information into stock prices. Our conclusions directly contradict existing studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1987-2010
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Finance
Volume65
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Local bias
Individual investors
Investors
Calendar
Purchase
Local information
Stock prices
Underperformance
Asymmetry of information
Methodology
Headquarters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Accounting
  • Finance
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Individual investors and local bias. / Seasholes, Mark; Zhu, Ning.

In: Journal of Finance, Vol. 65, No. 5, 10.2010, p. 1987-2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seasholes, Mark ; Zhu, Ning. / Individual investors and local bias. In: Journal of Finance. 2010 ; Vol. 65, No. 5. pp. 1987-2010.
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