Individual differences in episodic memory abilities predict successful prospective memory output monitoring

B. Hunter Ball, Margarida Pitães, Gene Brewer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Output monitoring refers to memory for one’s previously completed actions. In the context of prospective memory (PM) (e.g., remembering to take medication), failures of output monitoring can result in repetitions and omissions of planned actions (e.g., over- or under-medication). To be successful in output monitoring paradigms, participants must flexibly control attention to detect PM cues as well as engage controlled retrieval of previous actions whenever a particular cue is encountered. The current study examined individual differences in output monitoring abilities in a group of younger adults differing in attention control (AC) and episodic memory (EM) abilities. The results showed that AC ability uniquely predicted successful cue detection on the first presentation, whereas EM ability uniquely predicted successful output monitoring on the second presentation. The current study highlights the importance of examining external correlates of PM abilities and contributes to the growing body of research on individual differences in PM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalMemory
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 9 2018

Keywords

  • attention
  • episodic memory
  • individual differences
  • output monitoring
  • Prospective memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

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