Individual and contextual correlates of adolescent health and well-being

Elizabeth Anthony, Susan I. Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Assessing a broad positive outcome such as well-being presents numerous challenges and empirical investigations are limited. This study used an eco-interactional-developmental perspective based on risk and protective factors to examine individual and contextual correlates of health and well-being in a sample of 20,749 ethnically diverse middle and high school students. School fixed-effects regression analyses modeling a composite measure of well-being as a function of youth, peer, family, school, and neighborhood characteristics indicated that the measure was most stable when modeled as a global (vs. domain specific) composite. Relational (vs. expectation and behavioral) characteristics of parental and peer involvement were more influential in predicting adolescent well-being. The implications for interventions striving to enhance well-being across developmental transitions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-233
Number of pages9
JournalFamilies in Society
Volume91
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

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well-being
adolescent
health
school
regression
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Individual and contextual correlates of adolescent health and well-being. / Anthony, Elizabeth; Stone, Susan I.

In: Families in Society, Vol. 91, No. 3, 07.2010, p. 225-233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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