Indirect effects of the Family Check-Up on school-age academic achievement through improvements in parenting in early childhood

Lauretta M. Brennan, Elizabeth C. Shelleby, Daniel S. Shaw, Frances Gardner, Thomas J. Dishion, Melvin Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

This project examined the hypothesis that the impact of the Family Check-Up on parent use of positive behavior support would indirectly improve academic achievement scores at school age. The study included a sample of 731 high-risk families recruited from Women, Infant, and Children Supplemental Nutrition Program settings in 3 geographically distinct areas. The results demonstrated that changes in positive parenting between the child ages of 2 and 3 were associated with higher scores on children's school-age academic achievement, as measured by the Woodcock-Johnson III (W-J) Academic Skills composite. Moreover, structural equation modeling revealed that random assignment to the intervention was associated with higher levels of children's academic achievement at age 5 and age 7.5 indirectly, through greater increases in parents' use of positive behavior support in intervention families than in control families. Results are discussed with respect to the potential of a brief parenting intervention for improving parenting practices that promote academic achievement up to 5 years later. The results have promising implications for efforts to promote child adaptation in the school environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)762-773
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume105
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

Keywords

  • Academic achievement
  • Intervention
  • Parenting
  • Prevention
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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