#indigenous: Tracking the connective actions of Native American advocates on Twitter

Morgan Vigil-Hayes, Marisa Duarte, Elizabeth Belding, Nicholet Deschine Parkhurst

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

With fewer than 66% of eligible voters registered and voter turnout rates 5-14 percentage points lower than any other ethnic group, Native Americans comprise the least participatory ethnic group in U.S. political elections [42, 57, 49, 25]. While discourse surrounding Native American issues and interests has increasingly moved to social media [55, 56], there is a lack of data about Native American political discourse on these platforms. Given the heterogeneity of Native American peoples in the U.S., one way to begin approaching a holistic understanding of Native American political discourse on social media is to characterize how Native American advocates utilize social media platforms for connective action. Using a post-structural, interdisciplinary, mixed methods approach, we use theories of connective action [5] and media richness [14] to analyze a Twitter data set culled from influential Native American advocates and their followers during the 2016 primary presidential election season. Our study sheds light on how Native American advocates use social media to propagate political information and identifies which issues are central to the political discourse of Native American advocates. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the bandwidth characteristics of content impact its propagation and we discuss this in the context of pernicious digital divide effects present in Indian Country.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCSCW 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages1387-1399
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781450343350
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 25 2017
Event2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2017 - Portland, United States
Duration: Feb 25 2017Mar 1 2017

Other

Other2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2017
CountryUnited States
CityPortland
Period2/25/173/1/17

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Keywords

  • Civic engagement
  • Native American
  • Social media
  • Social network analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Human-Computer Interaction

Cite this

Vigil-Hayes, M., Duarte, M., Belding, E., & Parkhurst, N. D. (2017). #indigenous: Tracking the connective actions of Native American advocates on Twitter. In CSCW 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (pp. 1387-1399). Association for Computing Machinery. DOI: 10.1145/2998181.2998194

#indigenous : Tracking the connective actions of Native American advocates on Twitter. / Vigil-Hayes, Morgan; Duarte, Marisa; Belding, Elizabeth; Parkhurst, Nicholet Deschine.

CSCW 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing. Association for Computing Machinery, 2017. p. 1387-1399.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Vigil-Hayes, M, Duarte, M, Belding, E & Parkhurst, ND 2017, #indigenous: Tracking the connective actions of Native American advocates on Twitter. in CSCW 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing. Association for Computing Machinery, pp. 1387-1399, 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, CSCW 2017, Portland, United States, 2/25/17. DOI: 10.1145/2998181.2998194
Vigil-Hayes M, Duarte M, Belding E, Parkhurst ND. #indigenous: Tracking the connective actions of Native American advocates on Twitter. In CSCW 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing. Association for Computing Machinery. 2017. p. 1387-1399. Available from, DOI: 10.1145/2998181.2998194
Vigil-Hayes, Morgan ; Duarte, Marisa ; Belding, Elizabeth ; Parkhurst, Nicholet Deschine. / #indigenous : Tracking the connective actions of Native American advocates on Twitter. CSCW 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing. Association for Computing Machinery, 2017. pp. 1387-1399
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