Independent and joint associations of physical activity and fitness on stroke in men

John C. Sieverdes, Xuemei Sui, Duck chul Lee, I. Min Lee, Steven P. Hooker, Steven N. Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Recent studies have demonstrated that physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fi tness (CRF) are independent predictors of stroke in men. The combined associations of these 2 factors are not well established. Objective: To investigate the independent and joint associations of PA and CRF with fatal, nonfatal, and total stroke in a group of men. Methods: The current analyses included 45 689 men aged 18 to 100 years who completed baseline sessions between 1970 and 2001. All participants had no known myocardial infarction, stroke, or cancer. Physical activity was measured by questionnaire, and CRF was assessed from a maximal treadmill exercise test. The National Death Index for fatal stroke and mail-back surveys for nonfatal stroke were used to ascertain cases. Cox regression analyses were used to estimate the risk of stroke outcomes. Results: There were 619 cases over 800 582 person-years of observation. Signifi cant inverse associations were observed between CRF and fatal, nonfatal, and total strokes after adjustment for age and examination year (P for trend < 0.05 for each). No associations were found between PA and any of the 3 outcomes after adjusting for other covariates and CRF. Joint associations of 9 PA fi tness groups showed less risk for total stroke in the moderate and high fi tness categories. Conclusion: These fi ndings suggest that CRF is an independent predictor of incident stroke in asymptomatic men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-126
Number of pages8
JournalPhysician and Sportsmedicine
Volume39
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Physical Fitness
Stroke
Exercise
Exercise Test
Postal Service
Myocardial Infarction
Regression Analysis
Observation

Keywords

  • Cardiorespiratory fi tness
  • Epidemiology
  • Physical activity
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Sieverdes, J. C., Sui, X., Lee, D. C., Lee, I. M., Hooker, S. P., & Blair, S. N. (2011). Independent and joint associations of physical activity and fitness on stroke in men. Physician and Sportsmedicine, 39(2), 119-126.

Independent and joint associations of physical activity and fitness on stroke in men. / Sieverdes, John C.; Sui, Xuemei; Lee, Duck chul; Lee, I. Min; Hooker, Steven P.; Blair, Steven N.

In: Physician and Sportsmedicine, Vol. 39, No. 2, 05.2011, p. 119-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sieverdes, JC, Sui, X, Lee, DC, Lee, IM, Hooker, SP & Blair, SN 2011, 'Independent and joint associations of physical activity and fitness on stroke in men', Physician and Sportsmedicine, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 119-126.
Sieverdes JC, Sui X, Lee DC, Lee IM, Hooker SP, Blair SN. Independent and joint associations of physical activity and fitness on stroke in men. Physician and Sportsmedicine. 2011 May;39(2):119-126.
Sieverdes, John C. ; Sui, Xuemei ; Lee, Duck chul ; Lee, I. Min ; Hooker, Steven P. ; Blair, Steven N. / Independent and joint associations of physical activity and fitness on stroke in men. In: Physician and Sportsmedicine. 2011 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 119-126.
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