Incubating engineers, hatching design thinkers: Mechanical engineering students learning design through Ambidextrous Ways of Thinking

Micah Lande, Larry Leifer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Design Thinking and Engineering Thinking are complimentary yet distinct aspects of mechanical engineering design activities. This paper examines these distinctions in the context of mechanical engineering students designing in a project-based learning course at Stanford University. By qualitatively analyzing and plotting student teams' prototyping activities, the students' work patterns can generally be assessed along a framework of Ambidextrous Ways of Thinking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Mechanical engineering
Students
Engineers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

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