Increasing instrumentality without decreasing instructional time

An intervention for engineering students

Krista Puruhito, Jenefer Husman, Jonathan C. Hilpert, Tirupalavanam Ganesh, Glenda Stump

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Calculus is essential to the engineering curriculum, though its value is not necessarily apparent when the topics are first introduced to students. Our goal was to develop a series of interventions that credibly presented students with information about the utility of calculus topics through a 5-minute video segment. If successful, this intervention would provide instructors with a way to increase the perceived utility of the curriculum without significantly decreasing their instructional time. We recruited 463 students enrolled in Calculus II for engineers. All instructors teaching this course consented to participation in this study and classes were randomly assigned to video and no-video groups. The video group received three interventions during the weeks they were being exposed to the content. The no-video group did not receive any intervention of any kind but were measured at the same points in time as the video group. Results indicate that perceived instrumentality (PI) increased after the first intervention and remained high throughout the semester in the video group. The results suggest that the intervention influenced students perceptions of instrumentality. Theoretically, this provides additional evidence that PI, value, and orientation are constructs distinct from self-efficacy (SE); practically, it provides instructors with a way to improve student motivation without making extensive changes to their courses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event41st Annual Frontiers in Education Conference: Celebrating 41 Years of Monumental Innovations from Around the World, FIE 2011 - Rapid City, SD, United States
Duration: Oct 12 2011Nov 15 2011

Other

Other41st Annual Frontiers in Education Conference: Celebrating 41 Years of Monumental Innovations from Around the World, FIE 2011
CountryUnited States
CityRapid City, SD
Period10/12/1111/15/11

Fingerprint

video
Students
engineering
student
Curricula
instructor
Group
curriculum
Teaching
time
Engineers
semester
self-efficacy
Values
engineer
participation
evidence

Keywords

  • calculus intervention
  • perceptions of instrumentality
  • self-efficacy
  • task value

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Software
  • Education

Cite this

Puruhito, K., Husman, J., Hilpert, J. C., Ganesh, T., & Stump, G. (2011). Increasing instrumentality without decreasing instructional time: An intervention for engineering students. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE [6143091] https://doi.org/10.1109/FIE.2011.6143091

Increasing instrumentality without decreasing instructional time : An intervention for engineering students. / Puruhito, Krista; Husman, Jenefer; Hilpert, Jonathan C.; Ganesh, Tirupalavanam; Stump, Glenda.

Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. 2011. 6143091.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Puruhito, K, Husman, J, Hilpert, JC, Ganesh, T & Stump, G 2011, Increasing instrumentality without decreasing instructional time: An intervention for engineering students. in Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE., 6143091, 41st Annual Frontiers in Education Conference: Celebrating 41 Years of Monumental Innovations from Around the World, FIE 2011, Rapid City, SD, United States, 10/12/11. https://doi.org/10.1109/FIE.2011.6143091
Puruhito K, Husman J, Hilpert JC, Ganesh T, Stump G. Increasing instrumentality without decreasing instructional time: An intervention for engineering students. In Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. 2011. 6143091 https://doi.org/10.1109/FIE.2011.6143091
Puruhito, Krista ; Husman, Jenefer ; Hilpert, Jonathan C. ; Ganesh, Tirupalavanam ; Stump, Glenda. / Increasing instrumentality without decreasing instructional time : An intervention for engineering students. Proceedings - Frontiers in Education Conference, FIE. 2011.
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