Increasing access to individualized medicine: a matched-cohort study examining Latino participant experiences of genomic screening

Joel E. Pacyna, Gabriel Q. Shaibi, Alex Lee, Jamie O. Byrne, Idali Cuellar, Erica J. Sutton, Valentina Hernandez, Noralane M. Lindor, Davinder Singh, Iftikhar J. Kullo, Richard R. Sharp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Multiple efforts are underway to increase the inclusion of racial minority participants in genomic research and new forms of individualized medicine. These efforts should include studies that characterize how individuals from minority communities experience genomic medicine in diverse health-care settings and how they integrate genetic knowledge into their understandings of health-care needs. Methods: As part of a large, multisite genomic sequencing study, we surveyed individuals to assess their decision to pursue genomic risk evaluation. Participants included Latino patients recruited at Mountain Park Health Center, a Federally Qualified Health Center in Phoenix, Arizona, and non-Latino patients recruited at a large academic medical center (Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN). Both groups agreed to receive individualized genomic risk assessments. Results: Comparisons between cohorts showed that Latino respondents had lower levels of decisional conflict about pursuing genomic screening but generally scored lower on genetic knowledge. Latino respondents were also more likely to have concerns about the misuse of genomic information, despite both groups having similar views about the value of genomic risk evaluation. Conclusion: Our results highlight the importance of evaluating sociocultural factors that influence minority patient engagement with genomic medicine in diverse health-care settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)934-941
Number of pages8
JournalGenetics in Medicine
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)

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