In vitro neural injury model for optimization of tissue-engineered constructs

D. Kacy Cullen, Sarah Stabenfeldt, Crystal M. Simon, Ciara C. Tate, Michelle C. LaPlaca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stem cell transplantation is a promising approach for the treatment of traumatic brain injury, although the therapeutic benefits are limited by a high degree of donor cell death. Tissue engineering is a strategy to improve donor cell survival by providing structural and adhesive support. However, optimization prior to clinical implementation requires expensive and time-consuming in vivo studies. Accordingly, we have developed a three-dimensional (3-D) in vitro model of the injured host-transplant interface that can be used as a test bed for high-throughput evaluation of tissue-engineered strategies. The neuronal-astrocytic cocultures in 3-D were subjected to mechanical loading (inducing cell death and specific astrogliotic alterations) or to treatment with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), inducing astrogliosis without affecting viability. Neural stem cells (NSCs) were then delivered to the cocultures. A sharp increase in the number of TUNEL+ donor cells was observed in the injured cocultures compared to that in the TGF-β1-treated and control cocultures, suggesting that factors related to mechanical injury, but not strictly astrogliosis, were detrimental to donor cell survival. We then utilized the mechanically injured cocultures to evaluate a methylcellulose-laminin (MC-LN) scaffold designed to reduce apoptosis. When NSCs were codelivered with MC alone or MC-LN to the injured cocultures, the number of caspase+ donor cells significantly decreased compared to that with vehicle delivery (medium). Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of an in vitro model as a preanimal test bed and support further investigation of a tissue-engineering approach for chaperoned NSC delivery targeted to improve donor cell survival in neural transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3642-3651
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volume85
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Coculture Techniques
Neural Stem Cells
Wounds and Injuries
Cell Survival
Methylcellulose
Transforming Growth Factors
Laminin
Tissue Engineering
Cell Death
In Situ Nick-End Labeling
Stem Cell Transplantation
Caspases
Adhesives
In Vitro Techniques
Therapeutics
Transplantation
Apoptosis
Transplants

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Laminin
  • Neural stem cells
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

In vitro neural injury model for optimization of tissue-engineered constructs. / Cullen, D. Kacy; Stabenfeldt, Sarah; Simon, Crystal M.; Tate, Ciara C.; LaPlaca, Michelle C.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, Vol. 85, No. 16, 12.2007, p. 3642-3651.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cullen, D. Kacy ; Stabenfeldt, Sarah ; Simon, Crystal M. ; Tate, Ciara C. ; LaPlaca, Michelle C. / In vitro neural injury model for optimization of tissue-engineered constructs. In: Journal of Neuroscience Research. 2007 ; Vol. 85, No. 16. pp. 3642-3651.
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