In situ crosslinking temperature-responsive hydrogels with improved delivery, swelling, and elasticity for endovascular embolization

Derek J. Overstreet, Elizabeth J. Lee, Amrita Pal, Brent L. Vernon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Endovascular embolization of cerebral aneurysms is a common approach for reducing the risk of often-fatal hemorrhage. However, currently available materials used to occlude these aneurysms provide incomplete filling (coils) or require a complicated, time-consuming delivery procedure (solvent-exchange precipitating polymers). The objective of this work was to develop an easily deliverable in situ forming hydrogel that can occlude the entire volume of an aneurysm. The hydrogel is formed by mixing a solution of a temperature-responsive polymer containing pendent thiol groups (poly(NIPAAm-co-cysteamine) or poly(NIPAAm-co-cysteamine-co-JAAm)) with a solution of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA). Incorporation of hydrophilic grafts of polyetheramine acrylamide (JAAm) in the temperature-responsive polymer caused weaker physical crosslinking, facilitated faster and more complete chemical crosslinking, and increased gel swelling. One formulation (30 wt % PNCJ20 + PEGDA) could be delivered for over 220 s after mixing, formed a strong and elastic hydrogel (G' > 6000 Pa) within 30 min and once set, maintained its shape and volume in a model aneurysm under flow. This gel represents a promising candidate water-based material utilizing both physical and chemical crosslinking that warrants further investigation as an embolic agent for saccular aneurysms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • crosslinking
  • graft copolymer
  • hydrogel
  • injectable
  • N-isopropylacrylamide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

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