In Praise of Clark Kent: Creative Metacognition and the Importance of Teaching Kids When (Not) to Be Creative

James C. Kaufman, Ronald A. Beghetto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

88 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite creativity's many benefits and positive outcomes, there are still both explicit and implicit teacher biases against creative students. We argue that teachers do not dislike creativity but rather dislike inappropriate creativity that can come from students at poorly chosen times. After reviewing the literature on metacognition and creativity, we propose the adapted construct of creative metacognition (CMC), a combination of self-knowledge (knowing one's own creative strengths and limitations) and contextual knowledge (knowing when, where, how, and why to be creative). We end with ways that teachers can raise students' CMC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-165
Number of pages11
JournalRoeper Review
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • creative development
  • creativity
  • implicit biases
  • metacognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'In Praise of Clark Kent: Creative Metacognition and the Importance of Teaching Kids When (Not) to Be Creative'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this